18 December 2011

Rank 40 / 11: Kansas

Kansas:





Results of the last 6 presidential cycles:


Year
Rank
Winning %
% Margin
Part. Value
Swing“
National Swing
Trend
2008
40 / 12
56.48%
+14.92%
+22.18%
-10.46%
+9.72%
+0.74
2004
43 / 09
62.00%
+25.38%
+22.92%
+4.58%
+2.98%
+1.60
2000
41 / 11
58.04%
+20.80%
+21.32%
+2.59%
+8.00%
+5.41
1996
48 / 04
54.28%
+18.21%
+26.73%
+13.07%
+2.96%
+16.03
1992
40 / 12
38.88%
+5.14%
+10.70%
-8.09%
+13.29%
+5.20
1988
31 / 21
55.79%
+13.23%
+5.50%
-20.44%
-10.49%
+9.95

Blue shading = DEM pick-up over the cycle before.
Red shading = GOP pick-up over the cycle before.
Kansas was an even split in the last 6 cycles: 3 cycles DEM, 3 cycles GOP.

Kansas margin average, 1988-2008 (6 cycles): 
GOP +16.28% 


Within the summary is an analysis of the swings and trend values in KS over the last six cycles.


Trend: 
REPUBLICAN

KS county-by-county EXCEL spreadsheet
(raw totals for 2008 and 2004, margins, swings, % of state PV, county growth rate)

The partisan rankings for Ranking 40 (KS) and Ranking 41 (NE) from 2008 backwards in history to 1964 in Table-format (highlighted in yellow):

1996Margin '961992Margin '921988Margin '88Rank1984Margin '841980Margin '801976Margin '761972Margin '721968Margin '681964Margin '64



31 - 21MT2,38%NC12,43%LA7,68%NV1,02%OH1,83%KS13,23%31 - 21LA22,60%VA12,72%CA1,78%KY28,60%NH8,18%NV17,16%
32 - 20GA5,20%WV12,86%VA8,04%KY0,96%NH1,22%NJ13,64%32 - 20IN23,99%NJ13,42%IL1,97%NH29,12%SC5,79%ND16,09%
33 - 19SD8,41%TN14,27%CO8,36%GA1,17%GA0,59%AR14,18%33 - 19NC24,00%TX13,86%NJ2,16%AZ31,26%MT9,01%WY13,12%
34 - 18AZ8,48%LA14,51%GA11,69%CO1,37%NC0,79%NC16,26%34 - 18MS24,39%CA16,78%NM2,47%IN32,77%CO9,14%AR12,66%
35 - 17ND8,65%GA16,60%NC12,83%VA1,96%FL1,89%TN16,34%35 - 17VA25,19%FL17,02%WA3,88%TX32,96%VT9,22%IN12,42%
36 - 16SC8,98%SC17,08%AL14,88%MT2,88%AZ1,95%OK16,65%36 - 16SD26,47%NM18,18%NV4,36%LA36,97%FL9,60%NC12,30%
37 - 15TX11,76%MS19,69%KY15,13%SD3,46%TX3,48%AL19,30%37 - 15TX27,50%IN18,35%CT5,17%VA37,72%TN3,83%OK11,49%
38 - 14WV13,09%KY19,86%IN15,63%NC4,69%SD3,52%IN20,16%38 - 14SC27,99%CO24,00%MI5,39%TN37,95%NC8,25%SD11,22%
39 - 13MS13,17%MT20,50%SC15,93%TX4,93%VA4,37%GA20,25%39 - 13CO28,32%MT24,39%ND5,85%AR38,11%VA10,87%TN11,01%
40 - 12KS14,92%IN20,68%MS16,91%MS5,13%KS5,14%VA20,50%40 - 12FL30,66%KS24,56%MT7,44%KS38,15%SD11,31%UT9,73%
41 - 11NE14,93%SD21,47%KS20,80%IN5,58%WY5,60%MS20,82%41 - 11ND31,04%OK25,53%KS7,55%ID38,20%NM12,10%KS9,03%
42 - 10TN15,06%TX22,86%TX21,32%SC6,04%IN6,11%NV20,94%42 - 10KS33,67%AK27,94%IN7,62%WY38,54%IA12,19%VA7,36%
43 - 9KY16,22%KS25,38%OK21,88%ND6,81%AL6,77%NE20,96%43 - 9NV33,88%SD28,83%VT11,20%NC40,58%IN12,30%NE5,21%
44 - 8LA18,63%AK25,55%SD22,73%AL6,97%SC8,15%AZ21,21%44 - 8AZ33,88%NH29,39%NH11,28%NE41,00%OK15,70%FL2,30%
45 - 7AR19,85%AL25,62%MT25,07%OK7,81%OK8,62%FL22,36%45 - 7AK36,79%AZ32,36%CO11,47%UT41,25%ND17,71%ID1,83%
46 - 6AK21,54%ND27,36%ND27,60%WY12,98%MS8,92%WY22,52%46 - 6NH37,71%WY34,67%AZ16,57%SC42,66%UT19,42%AZ0,99%
47 - 5AL21,58%OK31,14%NE28,99%AK17,53%AK9,17%AK23,32%47 - 5OK37,94%NV35,64%WY19,49%FL44,12%AZ19,76%GA8,25%
48 - 4ID25,30%NE33,22%AK30,95%KS18,21%ND12,03%SC23,92%48 - 4NE41,74%ND37,97%NE20,74%AL46,89%KS20,13%LA13,63%
49 - 3UT28,02%ID38,12%ID39,53%ID18,54%ID13,61%ID26,07%49 - 3WY42,27%NE39,49%AK22,25%OK49,70%WY20,25%SC17,79%
50 - 2OK31,29%WY39,79%WY40,06%NE18,70%NE17,18%NH26,16%50 - 2ID45,97%ID41,27%ID22,76%GA50,39%ID26,13%AL38,90%
51 - 1WY32,24%UT45,54%UT40,49%UT21,07%UT16,03%UT34,17%51 - 1UT49,83%UT52,20%UT28,79%MS58,57%NE28,01%MS74,28%



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KS VR stats - N/A
KS population 2008: 2,802,134 KS Elections 1980-present
KS Population Density: 13.2 persons per sq. Km.
---
Electoral Vote Density: 467,022 persons per EV. ---

KS ELECTORAL DEVELOPMENT (electors through history) :  5 (1872-1880), 9 (1884-1888), 10 (1892-1928), 9 (1932-1940), 8 (1944-1960), 7 (1964-1980), 6 EV (1984-present).


SUMMARY

Kansas is the 12th most conservative state and the 40th most liberal state, with a Republican winning margin of +14.92% and having voted 22.18% more Republican than the national margin in 2008.

Kansas was the 9th most conservative state and the 43rd most liberal state in 2004, with a Republican winning margin of +25.38% and having voted 22.92% more Republican than the national margin in that year.

Kansas was also the 11th most conservative state and the 41st most liberal state in 2000, with a Republican winning margin of +20.80% and having voted 21.31% more Republican than the national margin in that year.


In it's entire electoral history, from 1864-present, Kansas went went for the GOP 
30 times, for the DEMS  6  times and for an independent candidate 1 time.


From 1904 - 2008, Kansas went for the GOP 
22 times, for the DEMS 5  times.

Since 1948, Kansas went for the GOP 
15 times, for the DEMS 1  time.

Since 1960, Kansas went for the GOP 
12 times, for the DEMS 1  time.


The area formerly known as the „Kansas Territory“ officially became the 34th state of the Union on January 29, 1861, just before the outbreak of the Civil War. The 15 th largest state in the Union by area, but the 33rd largest by population, KS was admitted as a „free“ state to the Union, though there were internal wars between the Topeka Coalition and the Wichita Coalition.


Kansas has had an overwhelmingly Republican voting record, having selected the Republican candidate for 30 of the 37 cycles that Kansas has voted in. Though VT has gone Republican 33 times and holds the record for the longest GOP streak (27 cycles from 1856-1960), KS, along with 8 other states, has the longest current running Republican voting record: KS, NE, SD, ND, WY, ID, UT, OK and AK have all voted GOP for 11 consecutive cycles since 1968. Every single one of these states was captured in the Johson (D) landslide of 1964 – had that not happened, then KS would have had 18 consecutive cycles, all the way back through 1940. I call these states that have gone 11 straight cycles for the GOP „The 11ers“ and most likely every single one of those states will become a „12er“ after 2012. Two states are not on that list, but both were „10er“s from 2004: IN and VA, both of which Obama picked-up in 2008. Here is a table of those 9 states.
9 Conservative States: “The 11ers”



Year
Kansas
Nebraska
South Dakota
North Dakota
Wyoming
Idaho
Utah
Oklahoma
Alaska
2008
14.92%
14.93%
8.41%
8.65%
32.24%
25.30%
28.02%
31.29%
21.54%
2004
25.38%
33.22%
21.47%
27.36%
39.79%
38.12%
45.54%
31.14%
25.55%
2000
20.80%
28.99%
22.73%
27.60%
40.06%
39.53%
40.49%
21.88%
30.95%
1996
18.21%
18.70%
3.46%
6.81%
12.98%
18.54%
21.07%
7.81%
17.53%
1992
5.14%
17.18%
3.52%
12.03%
5.60%
13.61%
16.03%
8.62%
9.17%
1988
13.23%
20.96%
6.34%
13.06%
22.52%
26.07%
34.17%
16.65%
23.32%
1984
33.67%
41.74%
26.47%
31.04%
42.27%
45.97%
49.83%
37.94%
36.79%
1980
24.56%
39.49%
28.83%
37.97%
34.67%
41.27%
52.20%
25.53%
27.94%
1976
7.55%
20.74%
1.48%
5.85%
19.49%
22.76%
28.79%
1.21%
22.25%
1972
38.15%
41.00%
8.63%
26.28%
38.54%
38.20%
41.25%
49.70%
23.51%
1968
20.13%
28.01%
11.31%
17.71%
20.25%
26.13%
19.42%
15.70%
2.64%
1964
9.03%
5.21%
11.22%
16.09%
13.12%
1.83%
9.73%
11.49%
31.82%
1960
21.35%
24.14%
16.43%
10.90%
10.03%
7.57%
9.64%
18.04%
1.88%
1956
31.23%
31.03%
16.77%
23.63%
20.16%
22.39%
29.12%
10.26%

1952
38.27%
38.31%
38.54%
42.58%
25.62%
31.00%
17.85%
9.18%

1948
9.02%
8.31%
4.80%
8.76%
4.35%
2.73%
8.96%
25.49%

1944
21.07%
17.16%
16.66%
8.35%
2.47%
3.49%
21.02%
11.36%

1940
14.47%
14.37%
14.82%
10.88%
5.93%
9.05%
24.67%
15.18%

1936
7.72%
16.40%
11.52%
33.03%
23.10%
29.77%
39.55%
34.14%

1932
9.43%
27.70%
29.23%
41.58%
15.25%
20.39%
15.47%
46.59%

1928
44.96%
27.01%
20.98%
10.34%
28.31%
29.30%
7.72%
28.28%

1924
37.94%
17.51%
12.73%
2.52%
20.88%
10.60%
19.32%
5.59%

1920
32.23%
33.41%
41.02%
59.60%
32.29%
31.26%
17.09%
5.50%

1916
5.86%
14.29%
3.90%
1.50%
12.77%
10.91%
20.96%
17.38%

1912
6.42%
14.56%
8.48%
4.42%
1.77%
1.05%
4.91%
11.18%

1908
9.58%
1.54%
23.76%
26.23%
15.76%
16.92%
16.97%
4.66%

1904
38.59%
37.94%
49.42%
54.73%
37.64%
40.37%
28.56%


1900
6.60%
3.24%
15.59%
15.60%
17.49%
3.83%
2.29%


1896
3.69%
5.35%
0.22%
11.92%
3.74%
56.79%
65.43%


1892
1.81%
2.04%
11.83%
0.50%
4.37%
9.90%


1888
24.21%
13.76%







1884
24.18%
16.78%







1880
30.68%
30.25%







1876
32.56%
29.40%







1872
33.66%
41.36%







1868
37.65%
27.81%







1864
61.41%
---







STATS
30 R/ 6 D / 1 Ind
29 R / 7 D
25 R / 4 D /
1 IND
24 R / 5 D /
1 IND
22 R / 8 D
19 R / 10 D / 1 IND
21 R / 8 D
16 R / 10 D
12 R / 1 D


Four of these GOP bastions have absolutely identical voting records from 1920 through 2008: KS, NE and both Dakotas. All four of these states have 20 R / 3 D voting records. WY, ID, UT and OK have more Democratic voting records in the 1940s. AK first participated in 1960, so no real comparison outside of the „11er“ category is possible.


Now, to Kansas alone: KS set it's own electoral record in the very first election, 1864, having given incumbent Abraham Lincoln 79.19% of the vote and a massive +61.41% winning margin. No candidate since then has come close to this statistic. The next 6 cycles, through 1988, were all wins of +24% or above, but it is interesting to notice that the margins got smaller every cycle, regardless of candidates and issues:


1864: +61.41%
1868: +37.65%
1872: +33.66%
1876: +32.56%
1880: +30.68%
1884: +24.18%
1888: +24.21%


Until 1892, KS was completely insulated from the environment around an election. The very close national elections of 1880, 1884 and 1888 were not felt in KS at all.


1892 gets a little more complicated: former incumbent Grover Cleveland, the national Democratic candidate for President in 1892 against incumbent Benjamin Harrison, was NOT on the ballot in KS in 1892. James Weaver, a man who appeared under a number of party names during the guilded age, WAS on the ballot in 1892 for both the People's Party and the Democratic party combined, and he won a narrow +1.81% margin over Harrison. This was not the only state where Cleveland was not on the ballot at all: it also happened in CO, ID and ND (Cleveland was on the ballot for the „Fusion Party“). As often happens when a party switches hands: it tends to switch them more than once. And sure enough, in 1896, William Jennings Bryan (D) would be the first Democrat to win KS, also with a narrow +3.69% margin. In 1900, incumbent McKinley shifted 10% of the state and returned it to the GOP with a +6.60% margin.


KS loved Teddy Roosevelt and gave him the largest win since 1864, a +38.59% margin and 64.81% of the vote. It would take 24 years for a Republican to top his statistic (Hoover, 1928). KS stayed in the GOP column in 1908, but was not crazy about Taft, he got a margin of „only“ +9.58%.


Note: KS was the first state in the Union to enact prohibition of alcohol, and so the „Prohibition Party“ was on the ballot regularly in KS during these times, with between 2%-4% of the PV.


In both 1912 and 1916, Woodrow Wilson carried KS. He was the first Democratic president in history to win the state and one of only 2 Democratic presidents to win KS twice (see: FDR), but both of his wins were minority wins. However, his margins were lean: +6.42% and+5.86%, respectively. Teddy Roosevelt, as a Bull-Mooser, upturned incumbent Taft and took second place in KS in 1912, with 32.88% of the vote, but he still lost to Wilson.


In the roaring 20s, KS went with the national GOP wave and rewarded Harding, Coolidge and Hoover with ever increasing margins of +32.23% (1920), +37.94% (1924) and +44.96% (1928, 72.02% of the PV and the number two record in KS, after Lincoln in 1864).


Unlike VT and ME in the northeast, KS was not able to resist the FDR landslide in 1932: Roosevelt won with 53.56% of the PV and a +9.43% margin, the first Democratic majority win in the state's history and also the largest Democratic margin in the states history. In 1936, the GOP picked a nominee who was the only GOP Governor to have survived the 1932 Democratic wave and one who claimed to have balanced his budget in his home state of KANSAS. His name was Alfred „Alf“ Landon. But the 1936 FDR wave was just too strong and Landon was unable to pick-up his own state against the incumbent Roosevelt, who won with a +7.72% margin but a higher actual percentage than in 1932.


However, in 1940, alongside a number of traditionally GOP states, KS returned to the Republican column and went to Wilkie (+14.47%) in 1940 and for Dewey (+21.07%) in 1944. KS picked Dewey again in 1948 against Truman, but by a far lesser margin of +9.02%This was a common phenomenon with Truman: he actually showed more strength than FDR in the West, 1948 compared to 1944, in spite of a lesser margin than FDR's last election.


Though Eisenhower was a son of Texas, Kansas treated him as a favorite son. The Eisenhower – Nixon margins in KS make for a sort of mirror image of each other:


1952 (Eisenhower / Nixon): +38.37%
1956 (Eisenhower / Nixon): +31.23%
1960 (Nixon / Lodge) : +21.35%
1968 (Nixon / Agnew): +20.13%
1972 (Nixon / Agnew): +38.15%


In 1972, Nixon finished where Eisenhower began.


The interruption between was, of course, Lyndon Baines Johnson, whose historic landslide captured the entire nation outside 5 states in the South and Goldwater's AZ. Johnson took KS for the Democrats with +9.03%, slightly under FDR's 1932 margin, but with the highest winning percentage for a Democrat: 54.09%. LBJ was the 6 th and last Democrat to ever win in KS. Note that no Democrat has ever won KS with double-digit margins, ever.


In 1976, Southern Democrat Jimmy Carter made the race in KS closer than most people thought possible, but Ford still prevailed with 7.55%. This is an especially interesting statistic in light of the fact that the GOP Vice-Presidential candidate, Bob Dole, is from Kansas.


KS loved Ronald Reagan (neither Carter nor Mondale campaigned in KS) and gave him +24.56% and +33.67% margins, respectively.


The last six cycles were already represented in the table at the beginning of the analysis, but in a nutshell: George W. Bush, Sr won KS both times, but with ever decreasing margins: +13.23% in 1988 and +5.14% in a three man race against Bill Clinton (D) and Ross Perot (Ind). The race in 1992 was the only GOP minority win in KS history and the worst percentual showing for a Republican since Taft (R) in 1912, also in a three-man race.


In 1996, KS rewarded favorite son Bob Dole, who last ran as VP candidate in 1976 and now as Presidential candidate, with a majority win of 54.29% and a +18.21%. This margin is comparatively lean compared to the Eisenhower and Nixon margins from the past, but still a large landslide, on the order to Obama's win in Washington State.


In 2000 and 2004, George W. Bush handily won KS with very large and stabile margins of +20.80% and +25.38%, respectively. Percentually, he came over 60%, just as Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan did in their second terms.


John McCain's win in KS was with a reduced margin of +14.92% is the 24th largest or the 6th leanest GOP win in KS history. It is also:


-is the fourth time in a row where the state suddenly went for the GOP with a leaner margin in what was or would have been a 3 rd GOP term in office: 1960 (after 2 Term Eisenhower), 1976 (after 2 Term Nixon), 1988 (after 2 Term Reagan), 2008 (after 2 term Bush).


-Obama's losing percentage in KS (41.55%) sets no records, but is close to Dukakis' take of the vote in 1988 (42.56%). Overall, it is the 7 th highest losing Democratic percentage in KS's history, after Bryan (1900, 45.96%), Carter (44.94%), Truman (44.61%) Bryan (1908, 42.88%), Dukakis (1988, 42.56%) and FDR (1940, 42.40%). Since there have been 7 Democratic wins in all of KS's electoral history, then Obama's percentage of the popular vote in this state puts him in 13 th place for the Democrats out of 37 election cycles, or inner the upper 1/3 of Democratic percentages. But 41.55% is not enough to even make a dent in a state.


- and interesting study in a 4 th party vote: 2008 showed a pretty even spread in the 4 th party „protest“ vote: Nader got 0.85%, Barr (Libertarian) got 0.54% and Baldwin (Reform Party – Perot) got 0.33%. Had the Nader vote gone for Obama and the Barr and Baldwin vote gone for McCain, then the winning margin would have barely budged.


-support for / evidence that neither Obama's race nor his family heritage (his mother was from Kansas) played a role in KS: he did pretty much the same as Michael Dukakis, another northern liberal Democrat, from 20 years earlier.

Kansas and Nebraska




Of all the states in the Union, no two states came as close to each other in winning margin as did Kansas and Nebraska. McCain won KS by +14.92% and he won NE by +14.93%. That is a difference of just 0.01% in margin. These two neighbor states have a common voting record that goes back father than any other of the „11ers“ mentioned above: from 1912 through 2008, both states have identical records for 26 cycles in a row. That is the longest consecutive voting record of any two states in the Union, ever. Not even North and South Dakota have such a long common voting record. Here is a table comparing the last six cycles between KS and NE. This table will also be provided in the Nebraska analysis. From the table and also from the partisan rankings chart in posting three, we can see that NE has the slightly more conservative voting record all along. In 5 of 6 cases, the winning percentage and the winning percentage margin was larger in NE. 1996 (Bob Dole) is the exception, since KS was his home state. Notice also that except for 2000, both states have trended in the same direction and the difference in trends is pretty evenly split. In 2008, we see that NE trended far more strongly Democratic than KS, because NE had faller to fall, so to speak, from 2004.

In the partisan rankings since 1964 (posting number 3), we see that NE has always been lower on the table than KS, meaning slightly closer to conservative ranking number 1 than KS, but not much more. Both states, excepting KS in 1988, have been within the top 12 most conservative states. KS has been between rankings 10 -12 for 8 cycles, whereas NE has been between rankings 2-4 for 6 cycles and was the most conservative state in the Union in 1968. Interestingly enough, these two states were closest to each other in the partisan rankings in during the two largest Democratic two-man race wins since 1964: 1964 and 2008. In 1964, it was KS 41/11 and NE 43 / 09 and in 2008 it was KS 40 / 12 and NE 41 / 11.

Comparison, KS and NE:


Year

Rank
Winning %
% Margin
Part. Value
Swing“
National Swing
Trend
2008
KS
40 / 12
56.48%
+14.92%
+22.18%
-10.46%
+9.72%
+0.74

NE
41 / 11
56.53%
+14.93%
+22.19%
-18.29%
+9.72%
+8.57
Diff:

1
NE +0.05
NE +0.01
NE +0.01
KS +7.83
---
NE +7.83









2004
KS
43 / 09
62.00%
+25.38%
+22.92%
+4.58%
+2.98%
+1.60

NE
48 / 04
65.90%
+33.22%
+30.76%
+4.23%
+2.98%
+1.25
Diff:

5
NE +3.90
NE +7.84
NE +7.84
KS +0.35
---
KS +0.35









2000
KS
41 / 11
58.04%
+20.80%
+21.32%
+2.59%
+8.00%
+5.41

NE
47 / 05
62.25%
+28.99%
+29.51%
+10.29%
+8.00%
+2.29
Diff:

6
NE +4.21
NE +8.19
NE +8.19
NE -7.70
---
NE +7.70









1996
KS
48 / 04
54.28%
+18.21%
+26.73%
+13.07%
+2.96%
+16.03

NE
50 / 02
53.65%
+18.70%
+27.22%
+1.52%
+2.96%
+3.48
Diff:

2
KS +0.63
NE +0.49
NE +0.49
KS +11.55
---
KS +11.55









1992
KS
40 / 12
38.88%
+5.14%
+10.70%
-8.09%
+13.29%
+5.20

NE
50 / 02
46.58%
+17.18%
+22.74%
-3.78%
+13.29%
+9.51
Diff:

10
NE +7.70
NE +12.04
NE +12.04
NE +4.31
---
NE +4.31









1988
KS
31 / 21
55.79%
+13.23%
+5.50%
-20.44%
-10.49%
+9.95

NE
43 / 09
60.15%
+20.96%
+13.23%
-20.78%
-10.49%
+10.29
Diff:

12
NE +4.36
NE +7.73
NE +7.73
KS +0.34
---
NE +0.34



Important details about KS:


Republicans:


-Every Republican President except Harrison (re-election attempt 1892) since 1964 has won KS, Lincoln, Grant, Hayes, Garfield, Harrison, McKinley, T. Roosevelt, Taft, Harding, Coolidge, Hoover, Eisenhower, Nixon, Ford, Reagan, Bush 41 and Bush 43.



Democrats:




-Only three Democratic Presidents in history have won KS: Wilson (2 times), FDR (2 times), LBJ

-Only one Democratic challenger who lost the GE won KS: Bryan (1896)

-No Democrat has ever won KS with a double-digit margin.



Independents:


Only one Independent has won KS: James Weaver (Populist and Dem.) in 1892, but the Democratic Party was NOT on the ballot in that year.



Based on its voting record, KS is not bellwether state, having missed the Electoral College winner in 8 of the last 27 cycles and having missed the PV winner in 9 of the last 27 cycles, and more recently, it has missed the Electoral College winner 5 times since 1960 and the PV winner 6 times since 1960.





Can KS become a battleground in 2012?


Most likely not. The continuing conservative trends in this state make it very unlikely that it could become a battleground. Even in a possible three-man race it would be likely that the GOP would score a majority win in The Sunflower State.


KS Superlatives
YEAR
Candidate
Winning %
Winning margin
GOP
1864
Lincoln
79.19%
 +61.41%
DEM
1964
---
1936
Johnson
---
FDR
+54.09%
---
---
+9.03%
---
+9.43%
IND
1892
Weaver
50.20%
+1.81% 
---------------------




All-time "squeaker"
1892
Weaver
50.20%
+1.81% 





In Kansas, the Governor, Lt. Governor, both Senators and all 4 US Representatives are Republicans. In the Kansas Legislature, the Republicans has a hypermajority in both Houses.

Facit: in 2007, I wrote: „Kansas is a safe Republican "firewall"-state. „




Facit 2011: Kansas is a safe Republican "firewall"-state. 

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